Since the early 1990s there has been a quiet tide of innovation in generating statistics using participatory methods. Development practitioners are supporting and facilitating participatory statistics from community-level planning right up to sector and national-level policy processes. Statistics are being generated in the design, monitoring and evaluation, and impact assessment of development interventions. The challenge laid down is to foster institutional change on the back of the methodological breakthroughs and philosophical commitment. The prize is a win–win outcome in which statistics are a part of an empowering process for local people and part of a real-time information flow for those aid agencies and government departments willing to generate statistics in new ways.

1 May 2014 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm
Speaker(s): Jeremy Holland

Local people can generate their own numbers – and the statistics that result are powerful for themselves and can influence policy.

Since the early 1990s there has been a quiet tide of innovation in generating statistics using participatory methods. Development practitioners are supporting and facilitating participatory statistics from community-level planning right up to sector and national-level policy processes. Statistics are being generated in the design, monitoring and evaluation, and impact assessment of development interventions. The challenge laid down is to foster institutional change on the back of the methodological breakthroughs and philosophical commitment described in this book. The prize is a win–win outcome in which statistics are a part of an empowering process for local people and part of a real-time information flow for those aid agencies and government departments willing to generate statistics in new ways.

About the author

Jeremy Holland is a Social Development Consultant with 20 years' experience in research and advisory work in developing and transitional countries. He works on poverty and policy analysis, monitoring and evaluation, participatory governance and political economy. Jeremy has a particular interest in combining methods for measuring and analysing the non-material dimensions of poverty. Between 1996 and 2005, Jeremy was a lecturer at the Centre for Development Studies in Swansea. During this time his advisory work included inputs on Poverty and Social Impact Analysis, Participatory Rights Assessment and various Participatory Poverty Assessments.

In 2004 to 2005, he worked with the World Bank's Poverty-Reduction Group on conceptualising and operationalising the Bank's approach to measuring empowerment. From 2006 to 2009, Jeremy established a Social Development Team at Oxford Policy Management. Jeremy's recent publications include:

  • Who Counts? The Power of Participatory Statistics (2013)
  • Tackling the Governance of Socially Inclusive Service Delivery (2012)
  • Measuring Gender Equality in Organisational Learning (2011)
  • Quantitative and Qualitative Methods in Impact Evaluation and Measuring Results (2009).

You can order the book, Who Counts: The Power of Participatory Statistics from the IDS Bookshop.

Who Counts? The Power of Participatory Statistics

Location:
Institute of Development Studies
United Kingdom
Partner(s): Institute of Development Studies
Public - open to all