There is widespread recognition that mixed methods approaches are a ‘platinum standard’ in research and evaluation and the expanding availability of secondary quantitative data creates unprecedented opportunities for studying poverty and evaluating poverty reduction programmes. At the same time it presents methodological shortcomings that are under-explored.
25 May 2016 - 3:30pm
Speaker(s): Keetie Roelen
There is widespread recognition that mixed methods approaches are a ‘platinum standard’ in research and evaluation and the expanding availability of secondary quantitative data creates unprecedented opportunities for studying poverty and evaluating poverty reduction programmes. At the same time it presents methodological shortcomings that are under-explored. This seminar explores the ‘matching problem’ and a participatory tool for overcoming this challenge in a bid to offer wider reflections about the combination of secondary and primary data as well as quantitative and qualitative data in mixed methods studies and evaluation. It does so in reference to research on child poverty in Burundi, Ethiopia and Vietnam.
 
Keetie Roelen is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) and co-director of the Centre for Social Protection (CSP). Her research interests include the dynamics of (child) poverty, social protection and the linkages between child protection and social protection. Her research’ geographical focus is on Sub Saharan Africa and South East Asia, and the majority of the research uses mixed methods. Keetie has worked with many international organisations and NGOs such as UNICEF, Concern and Family for Every Child for research, evaluation and policy advice and her work has been published in the form of peer-reviewed journal publications and book chapters, working papers and project reports.
Location:
Arts 0.28, University of East Anglia
Norwich Research Park
NR4 7TJ Norwich , NFK
United Kingdom
Partner(s): Institute of Development Studies, University of East Anglia
Public - open to all